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Trump Doonbeg Creates Culinary Majesty

Trump Doonbeg Creates Culinary Majesty


The Trump International Golf Links & Hotel in Doonbeg, Ireland, is any golfer’s paradise with a stunning course and sweeping views of the Irish coastline. While the golfing is top-notch, as is the scenery, it is now becoming a food destination all in its own right. The Lodge at Doonbeg joined the Trump Collection with a new name earlier this year and is already beginning to make its mark as a vibrant hotel with stellar food and beverage offerings.

The evening we arrived on property was the first night of its annual Christmas market that takes place at the end of November, so we were welcomed by a beautiful fireworks display. The three-day Christmas market was home to a variety of culinary stalls as well as art, clothing, and other holiday treats.

Following our grand Christmas fireworks entrance, we made our way to the property’s Ocean View Restaurant, whose menu showcased the local succulent seafood offerings. The restaurant also had the ability to cater to those with food allergies and intolerances. They had gluten-free bread waiting for me the moment we sat down, a gesture greatly appreciated by this gluten-free traveler.

To start our meal, we sampled fresh sea scallops dusted with peas and bacon that were light yet packed with flavor. For the main course, we split a rack of lamb paired with creamy mushroom and broccoli risotto as well as a cod dish with mussels, crab claws, prawns and spinach.

We choose to pair our meal with a nice, crisp sauvignon blanc from New Zealand to balance the delicate flavors of the seafood. Following our dinner, we popped into the hotel’s more casual restaurant and took a seat at the bar for a nightcap. Decorated lavishly in Christmas decorations, the bar was a great place for a leisurely glass of wine before retiring to our lovely cottage for the evening.

Our two-floor cottage had a complete kitchen, dining room table, and sitting room with a fireplace for those who are looking to have a quiet meal that feels like home, even if you find yourself far away from it. The hotel also provides a CD with music to play while sipping your wine by the fireside — or in my case, journaling and writing down my favorite moments of my experience.

Breakfast at the Trump was an equally special experience, also served at the Ocean View Restaurant overlooking the vast golf course. I almost didn’t recognize the space I had only been in several hours before for dinner. My sister and I had a long drive ahead of us and decided to enjoy breakfast to regain our strength for the day ahead.

We opted for the traditional Irish breakfast plate that was far and away one of the most authentic and scrumptious Irish breakfasts I’ve eaten. I paired my gluten-free bread with a variety of homemade jams to start, along with some fresh fruit and a warm pot of coffee.

Next came a glorious plate of bacon, sausage, blood pudding, and eggs that reminded me of my childhood when my Irish grandmother would serve me breakfast or take us to the most authentic Irish pubs in New York that served dishes reminiscent of her homeland.

As I sat and ate my breakfast quietly with my sister, watching families stroll out onto the golf course and sipping my warm coffee, I was thankful for the authentic Irish experience to continue my exploration of a beautiful country and do so in such an elegant setting.


  • Mark Porter took a culinary tour of Ireland's west coast, starting at Galway Bay
  • Highlights included Linnane's Lobster Bar in New Quay Pier, and Fishy in Kinsale
  • Another favourite was the Wild Honey Inn located in the village of Lisdoonvarna

Published: 10:38 BST, 22 September 2018 | Updated: 09:19 BST, 24 September 2018

We took the highway west out of Dublin to the coast. I fancied a dose of ozone after a surfeit of the city — and soon we were feasting on freshly caught seafood on Galway Bay.

Linnane’s Lobster Bar in New Quay Pier is the place. Gerry Sweeney, who caught our vast platter, was at the bar in his sea boots. It doesn’t get fresher than that.

One glass of chablis could easily have been more but the Wild Atlantic Way, as the coastal road is known, beckoned. Ana and I drove south through the fastness of County Clare where dreamy cattle in cream fur coats ruminated among the boulder strewn verdure.

Local colour: Enjoy the delights of Dingle bay (above)

At Aillwee Cave, Burren, we crossed bridged chasms to the thunderous backdrop of waterfalls.

At the nearby Cliffs of Moher, we walked along the terrifying path and took photographs of fools standing right on the edge, to get that possibly final vainglorious selfie, next to the big red sign warning them not to do so.

We dined that evening in the discreet warmth of the Wild Honey Inn, whose Michelin-rated restaurant draws folk to the coastal village of Lisdoonvarna.

The morning was misty and the sea views veiled, but as we rounded a peninsula on the Dingle road we stumbled into a ‘lamb stroking station’, where for €3 we could fondle a bedraggled lamb.


Makena Majesty

An oceanfront home brings style and grace to Maui's southern shore.

Story by Marti Rosenquist | Photography by Nina Kuna & Don Bloom/Tropical Light

Maui boasts any number of stunning estates. Yet, as I make my way through lushly landscaped terraces that lead to the massive mahogany-and-glass front door, it is immediately apparent that this oceanfront manor rests at the pinnacle of island luxury.

Designed by Maui architect Hugh Farrington, the home exudes good taste, stylish restraint, and the blessing of perfectly balanced proportions. It sits on nearly an acre, fronting a black-sand beach, with expansive, unobstructed views of the sea. The property is large enough to accommodate manicured lawns, an infinity-edge pool, flower and herb gardens, and multiple furnished lanais. A fire pit, perfect for roasting marshmallows on cool evenings, creates an atmosphere of fun and relaxation, as do the tiki torches lighting the gardens, and a hammock suspended between two palm trees near the kitchen.

“We know it could never get better than this,” Sara tells me as we stroll the grounds. “This home was designed for serenity. It’s so peaceful here.”

While she speaks, I study the cove at the property’s perimeter, thinking it could have served as backdrop for the film South Pacific. My eyes lock on Molokini, and with bees buzzing in the hibiscus behind me, I am struck by how beautiful the crescent islet looks from here, how fortunate we are to be on Maui, and how gloriously blue the ocean appears this morning. Filled with a heightened sense of well-being, courtesy of the hypnotic view, I nod in agreement.

Serenity. Privacy. Unmatched. The words have barely left Sara’s lips when a flock of tiny birds chatters and swoops overhead like children playing tag in the air above us. In a moment, it’s silent again, but for the breezes rising off the beach.

“Is it always this quiet?” I wonder aloud.

“Yes,” says Sara. “At night, with the lānai doors open, we hear the whales breathing as they track back and forth in the channel.”

It’s hard to imagine living more comfortably in tune with the environment than in this house that has been carefully designed to preserve the natural surroundings, its noisiest neighbors whales and birds. I sense that the homeowners feel a kuleana, or responsibility, to their dwelling and land. From the use of organic materials, including a coral-stone exterior, to the priority given to creating garden and ocean views from every window and passageway, the 6,000-square-foot residence ideally fits its location.

“At night we walk out to the sand to watch the sun go down. Suddenly it’s long past dark, yet there we sit, content to do nothing but take it all in. Often we just skip dinner and stay out there instead,” Sara admits.

One needn’t go far to satisfy an appetite, however. An outdoor kitchen sits midway between the house and the beach, adjacent to the fifty-foot-long pool. There, it’s possible to serve a dozen or more guests with ease in the trellised pergola. It’s an ideal late-afternoon entertainment venue, providing shelter and shade from the westerly sun.

When it’s just the two of them, the primary kitchen affords Sara and her husband open-air access to the wonders of their surroundings. Fully retractable doors provide seamless access to the ocean-view lānai. From the double-story windows over the sink, they can admire the activities of the Japanese White-eyes frolicking in the trees just beyond.

“We like to sit here with morning coffee. There’s always something going on out there in the garden,” Sara says.

Highlights of the stylish kitchen include an oversized butcher-block island appliances by Sub-Zero, Wolf and Thermador and, just down the hallway, a walk-in wine cellar. Custom-crafted Honduran-mahogany cabinets were inspired by the design of an antique chest in the adjacent dining room.

“My husband gave me this chest as an anniversary present,” Sara says. “We both loved the design so much, we decided to carry this theme throughout the kitchen.”

One of the couple’s many treasures is an antique Chinese door, constructed entirely of wooden pieces that fit together like a puzzle, without the benefit of nail or dowel.

“The story of this door is that the Emperor of China would have two generals guarding his palace at all times,” Sara tells me. “It became a tradition for people to paint images of generals on their door.”

Along with carefully curated art and furnishings, the home reveals an impeccable sense of “form following function,” with artistic solutions to technical issues. Media equipment is sequestered behind panels of custom-crafted fretwork artwork hides the recessed, flat-screen TV. Cabinets separating the living and dining room were commissioned as part of the architecture, serving as room dividers in the otherwise open space.

The guest wing features a private entrance into the home, so that visiting friends and family can “do their own thing,” as Sara puts it. For people with mobility issues, there’s a full-sized elevator—which the owners acknowledge also comes in handy for transporting suitcases and box-store shopping sprees.

The mention of Costco rattles my reverie. It’s easy to forget such mundane chores are necessary even for residents of a home that boasts a luxurious master bath, an open-air shower, a private work-out room, and a Zen garden replete with what Sara calls “a door to enlightenment”—even though (perhaps because?) it leads nowhere.

Before I depart, Sara leads me to one more amenity: an herb garden blossoming in the bright sunshine. She plucks a fragrant bouquet and hands it to me, a parting gift of culinary herbs from a fellow cook and gardener.

Once in the car, I inhale deeply, hoping to maintain the tranquility I have felt in this home for a few more hours. Or at least until I make it through Costco.


COVID-19 smell loss leads to culinary experimentation

Home cooks who can't smell have an influx of new recipes to choose from as COVID-related anosmia spurs innovation in the kitchen.

Recipes focus on foods with bright colors, contrasting textures and geometric shapes, drawing on senses besides smell and taste to help anosmics enjoy eating.

Why it matters: For people with smell loss or distorted smell and taste (parosmia) — common COVID-related symptoms — coffee is simply hot water, popcorn is "thorny foam," or food smells like literal garbage.

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For the most part, there’s no cure.

The big picture: At least one cookbook aimed at those with compromised senses has already come out. Another — a book deal that came together pre-pandemic — is in the works, smell researcher and one of the authors Robert Pellegrino told Axios.

To get an idea of the types of dishes that could be in the book, think: hot rice with cold chicken, onigiri, juicy omelettes.

"You want it to be arousing," says Pellegrino, a postdoctoral fellow at Monell Chemical Senses Center.

Between the lines: There’s evidence that people desperate to regain the pleasures of eating are already experimenting with these methods.

New York Times restaurant critic Tejal Rao, who lost her sense of smell due to COVID-19, wrote for the New York Times Magazine about rediscovering her appetite thanks to mala — a combination of chiles and Sichuan peppercorns that creates a buzzing sensation in the mouth. She published an accompanying recipe for spicy and tingly beef.

Others have reported dousing their food in mustard and hot sauce, per Eater.

A Dutch cookbook author who's had anosmia nearly her whole life suggested this recipe in CNN last year: a veggie burger heavy on spices and the crunch of peanuts.

The bottom line: "You don’t know how important sense of smell is until you lose it," Pellegrino said. "It completely takes away the pleasure of eating and socializing at the dinner table."

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Top Kremlin Pundits Celebrate Mid-Air Takedown of Journo Facing Execution

PETRAS MALUKAS/AFP via Getty ImagesAs many around the world gasped over the outrage taking place in Belarus—where authorities forced down a passenger jet in order to arrest a journalist—pro-Kremlin propagandists were nothing short of delighted about the incident, rejoicing and celebrating in Moscow.On Sunday, Belarusian authorities ordered a Ryanair flight that took off from Athens to land in Minsk under false pretenses—a mere pretext to arrest a journalist on board. Roman Protasevich faces the death penalty after being placed on a “terrorist” list for his reporting on police brutality during anti-government protests in Belarus last year.“Never thought I’d be jealous of Belarus for any reason. But now I’m jealous. Well done, Batka,” tweeted Margarita Simonyan, the head of Russian state-sponsored news outlets RT and Sputnik, using the nickname for Belarusian president Alexander Lukashenko.Journalist Snatched from Flight Faces Belarus ‘Death Penalty’Appearing on the state TV show Sunday Evening with Vladimir Soloviev, Simonyan doubled down on her support for the actions of the Belarusian dictator. “That was brazen. Great job. That’s how it ought to be done. I, for one, support such measures.” In response to media inquiries, Simonyan tweeted a poem that seemed to suggest the journalist “had it coming.”As for the method used to apprehend Protasevich, state TV experts said they’re shocked not by Lukashenko’s tactics—which they described as perfectly normal—but by the reactions from the West.Speaking on Russian state TV show 60 Minutes, political scientist Vladimir Kornilov suggested: “Let's dispatch our Snowden to Cuba for a vacation and see what happens then.” Likewise, Russia’s Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova claimed to be “shocked” not by Lukashenko’s actions, but instead by what she described as “Western hypocrisy” in this regard.Yury Afonin, a member of the State Duma for the Russian Federation, said on 60 Minutes: “Any traitor to their country—and Protasevich is a traitor and terrorist—will be held accountable. It’s unavoidable.” On another show, political scientist Sergey Mikheyev suggested that Russia could learn a thing or two from the Ryanair incident. “[Lukashenko] created an important precedent for us to follow in dealing with such people.”RT’s Margarita Simonyan was excited that the opposition journalist was captured in such a brazen manner. Perhaps unsurprisingly so, given that she is one of the most vocal proponents of the idea that Russia should ban any media that isn’t owned or controlled by the government.On the state media talk show The Right to Know in February, Simonyan said: “All resources and instruments that could be used to influence or alter the mentality of the masses and the mood of society need to be owned by us, by our country.” She added: “The West is in a state of war with Russia—a sanction war at the minimum, information war, hybrid war, etcetera. And yet they’re funding everything tied to the opposition. Should we close down everything Western? Yes, I think so.”To erase any notion of adherence to democratic values, Simonyan clarified: “Why would I see danger in limiting the freedom of speech when I don’t believe in freedom of speech?”During the state media talk show The Evening with Vladimir Soloviev in March, Simonyan urged: “We must cut anyone who is working for their [Western] money out of Russian political life. Everyone. It has to be forbidden through legislation. Do you want to be in politics or media—and media is the same thing as politics—you can’t do that, if you’re receiving even one dollar from over there.” At the same time, Simonyan is adamant that Russian state-funded RT and Sputnik should be able to freely function in Western countries.Russia State Media Gears Up for a War ‘Against the West’Russian President Vladimir Putin isn’t far behind Lukashenko in his quest to silence dissent and eliminate any media coverage that dares to question his authoritarian rule. He falsely claims that Russia’s very survival is in peril, as the West is allegedly scheming to destroy the nation by removing him from his otherwise unending presidency through nefarious means.The Kremlin’s extensive propaganda apparatus is dedicated to painting the United States as a relentless, omnipresent foe. On state-funded media outlet Sputnik this month, Russian Foreign Ministry Spokeswoman Maria Zakharova asserted her belief that the Internet as a whole is secretly controlled by the U.S. government.“It’s a scary snake pit,” Zakharova exclaimed, describing the world wide web as a tool of hybrid warfare used to interfere in the affairs of sovereign nations. The Russian government’s intent to separate the country’s internet from the rest of the world is being portrayed to average Russians as a set of measures that is being implemented for their own good, as opposed to the real beneficiary: Russian President Vladimir Putin.The only solution that is being proposed by the Kremlin to the Russian people is systematic elimination of the internal opposition, along with getting rid of the foreign media operating within Russia’s borders, and the eventual creation of the “sovereign internet,” which would operate separately from the world wide web. The Kremlin’s propagandists are working overtime to convince the citizens that what they really want is less freedom, more oppression, no plurality in media and no change in power. In other words, a surefire formula to ensure that Putin remains president for life.On Sunday Evening with Vladimir Soloviev in March, RT’s Simonyan made an Orwellian claim that the Russian people are not suffering from lack of freedom but are instead unhappy with excessive freedoms being afforded by the government—and should be glad to give them up for the good of the country. On The Evening with Vladimir Soloviev last Tuesday, Russian lawmaker Oleg Morozov advocated arresting people left and right, with no regard for what the West might say or do about it. “There is a war of annihilation being waged against my country,” Morozov claimed, as he urged authorities to crack down on the opposition to prevent an uprising.Girlfriend of Belarusian Activist Also Snatched From Hijacked Commercial FlightWhile opposition leader Alexei Navalny languishes in prison, state media personalities are claiming that the Russians want Putin’s opponents to be crushed in a more violent manner. During his nightly broadcast last Tuesday, state media host Vladimir Soloviev claimed: “Our liberals are pushing the country back to 1937 [Stalin’s year of terror], which would be welcomed by a sizable segment of the population. It could get very bloody.” This message is meant not only to feed the worst instincts of the masses, but also to deter any internal opposition, while the external influence is systematically uprooted.Describing the effect of Foreign Agent Registration Act (FARA), Margarita Simonyan claimed last year that RT’s U.S.-based reporters are being “subjected to horrific pressure from their media, their names are being published, they are being shamed, influence is being exerted upon their friends and their family.” She shamelessly contended: “No normal person could possibly like a monopoly in media. That kind of monopoly leads to fallacies and mistakes. And when the matter at hand pertains to geopolitics and the world order, fallacies and mistakes can be deadly.”As Roman Protasevich likely faces torture at the hands of Lukashenko's regime, Russian state TV hosts and experts pointed out with cruel glee that he will be forced to provide information about supposedly being funded by Western intelligence agencies, further enforcing the illusion that anyone who dares to question the government is a foreign-funded “traitor.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

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The recipe for mozzarella in carrozza is very old and, even though its origins are not entirely clear, it seems it was invented by housewives in Southern Italy as a recycling recipe to make use of a few days’ worth of leftover mozzarella and stale bread. The slices of bread are dipped in beaten egg and breadcrumbs and then delicately wrapped around the mozzarella.

This unusual sandwich is then fried in hot oil, drained and eaten piping hot with the stringy mozzarella ready to delight even the most high-brow tastes. With its inimitable taste, mozzarella in carrozza has won over Italians, and many others as well: today it is still prepared with the same few simple ingredients that guarantee unparalleled culinary success!


Bangkok -- the Lady Gaga of Asia

I love Bangkok. I even love arriving here, slipping into the languorous heat of this fabulous city. Food, traffic, sex, pollution: this town has it all. Far from the austere majesty of Beijing, the befuddling hubbub of Hanoi, the dilemma that is Delhi, Bangkok screams and teems. All pinks and neons, there is nothing half-baked about Bangkok. Pouting, flouting, leering, sneering, Bangkok is the Lady Gaga of Asia.

Thai food is like condensed milk: I cannot even imagine the amount of self loathing required to not absolutely love it.

And Bangkok is hands down the world's greatest city for street food. It simply doesn't get better than this. I've never had a bad meal here, and its street food is the foundation of Thai culinary culture. In fact, twice I have been here and only eaten street side, it's that good. Everywhere, everyday everyone chows down on cheap, great grub.

In a few short chilli addled days, I quaffed sweet sausage soup with salted egg and rice noodles, sugar stoked Thai iced coffee with espresso, evaporated milk, sugar, sugar and then sugar (when once I asked to "hold the sugar," I got a look that conveyed concern at my sanity), fresh squeezed fresh juice made from giddily sweet tiny green oranges, Chiang Mai sausage, som tum-Thailand's eponymous green papaya salad made to order in a big wooden mortar, green coconut juice, spicy fried chicken, jackfruit smoothie, searingly hot noodle dishes, sparkling salads of pork skin and morning glory, fried crab and green mango. It's a rollercoaster of counterpoints: hot, cold, smooth, crunchy, sweet, sour, up, down that at times has you gasping, but always happy. Countless satays, noodle salads, fresh cut mangoes, guavas, papayas juicily displayed in glass cases on wheels, and more and more and more that you grab and graze as you go. It's endless and fabulous and expertly made. People specialize -- one vendor makes only coconut pancakes, another banana fritters -- that's it. Hence, they are perfect, all finesse and focus.

But do you know what I see, as I jostle through barely passable streets and markets, crowded with food stalls and happy eaters? I see an extremely successful cuisine. Each of these vendors is a micro- economy -- often family based -- making food that is an expression of the heart. And because this food is Thai in origin, it reaches further into the farms and fisherman and food producers to create a dynamic of culinary prosperity.

With all of this outside, why would you go into a restaurant? Simple, really. In a city that is devoted to eating, the excellence on the street has urged even greater excellence indoors. So when my buddy Quentin Dante, a restaurant refugee from New York, now happily based in Bangkok from where he creates restaurants all over Asia, said to me one sultry Silom soir "Tonight I am going to take you to the best restaurant in the world," I nodded meekly like an obedient food slave.

Issaya Siamese Club is a gorgeous, colourful Thai style plantation mansion -- replete with its own organic gardens -- set within an intestinal maze of streets in Bangkok's Sathon district, an absolute oasis in the midst of the madness. Ian Kittichai, hands-down Thailand's hottest, hippest celebrity chef, owns it, although he would never call himself that. I knew of him from New York days when he wowed som tum savvy New Yorkers with his sparkling cuisine at Kittichai. At Issaya, we loved the banana flower and heart of palm salad, with crispy shallots and roasted peanuts in a dried chili-coconut dressing -- all crunch and contrast -- and woofed down the warmly spiced chilli glazed baby back ribs, cooked on a small banana leaf wrapped grill on the table. Equally more-ish was "Larb Gai," a tangy, bright chicken salad with home-grown mint and saw tooth coriander in a roasted sticky rice dressing. In fact, everything we ate was a revelation -- it was as if I had never had Thai food before. Everything was familiar, yet reinvented and refined. Ian was bought up on the streets of Bangkok, and as a lad cooked for his mothers food stall, Ian is the real deal. Chatting with him, the street is never far away. His playful nature coupled with seriously good food makes him far more than a celebrity chef -- he is strengthening Thai food culture. This food, in this place, with this very likeable chef: the sum of the experience, yep, I'm with Mr. Dante. Issaya Siamese Club really may be the best restaurant in the world.

When it rains in this town, it does so forcefully and outdoor dining loses it's thrill quickly. Rain forced me off the street and into Som Tum Der on Soi Saladaeng just off Silom, and I am glad it did. Once again, the menu here respects the roots of its wonderful dishes, this time from the Isan region in Northern Thailand. Chef and partner Kornthanut Kittiyanon excels at casual but terrifically satisfying plates like Sa Pok Kai Tod Der, the best fried chicken I've ever had, som tum green papaya salad with Isan's distinctive fermented crab, cooling Lemongrass Ice Tea, and his desserts are worth a long distance flight for. I loved his Bua bi Pheuk, smoothly soothing taro balls in a kind of warm coconut soup with shredded young coconut meat. Plus he is about the chicest chef you'll ever see, sporting a jauntily askew panama hat and a fabulous smile! The room is wi fi wonderful and a cool respite from the street. I noticed that there was terrific clarity of flavour here that I put down to using high quality oils and less sugar than the more typical Bangkok fare. Chatting to co-owner Eh Laoraowirodge, I was impressed by the dedication that both he and Chef Korn have for the preservation of Isan cuisine. " You ought to try my other restaurant then" he said. "That's Isan home style food."

One adrenalin pulsing tuk-tuk ride later, I was in Sukhumvit and at Supanniga Eating Room. The menu is based on the dishes that Eh's mother and grandmother cooked for him as child, Isan Soul Food. It's a whole education in the heritage of the region, with unique ingredients and dishes that evoke country cooking and warmth. Moo Cha Muang (Pork stew with pleasingly bitter cha muang leaves with supposedly medicinal properties) is out and out grandma food. I loved the hard boiled eggs with a tangy tamarind dressing, and the chilli spiked pork mince served on a cooling tangerine round. Yam Cha Plu- a delicate warm sardine salad with cha plu leaves was, well. sardines have never been so well dressed. Eh is passionate about this food, it is full of emotion and recollection for him, and he comes alive when talking about it. The room is like the home you wish you had, with lighting that makes everyone look sultry in an unfussed but stylish décor.

I love that all three restaurants offer authentic, rooted cuisine, but with the added know-how of great technical chefs, the cuisine is energized, made dynamic. Also -- I learnt so much about Thailand from each place. This is Thailand beyond tum yum. All three "told the story" and this is what I think makes a restaurant truly great.


Masterchef alert: When Putin, Jinping took a break from meetings to show off their culinary skills

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping took a break from meetings to show off their culinary skills, cooking blini topped with caviar. Here are other state heads who know their way around the global stage as well as the kitchen.

Just roll with it

While the Canadian Prime Minister may have been criticised during his trip to India this year, there is one thing we can’t fault him on, his roti-making skills.

When Justin Trudeau and his family visited the Golden Temple in Amritsar, they got a hands-on experience in making rotis — under the watchful eye of celebrity chef Vikas Khanna who tweeted a picture of the family. He captioned it: “Teaching the beloved Trudeau family to roll Breads at The Holy Golden Temple. The same place where I learnt to cook.”

Mental about lentil
It’s no surprise that the former president of the US is a deft hand in the kitchen, given that his wife Michelle is an advocate for healthy eating. And one such wholesome meal that Obama can bring to the table is none other than the Indian staple, dal.

Agencies
Obama credited his knowledge to the fact that he had Indian and Pakistan roommates, whose mothers taught him to cook the dish. He said, “I am pretty sure I am the first US President with a dal recipe.” However, Obama revealed that chapatis were too hard for him to master.

Taste for taters
Food is a way to a man’s and voters’ heart, according to Angela Merkel. The German Chancellor, who can make “really good potato soup”, finally revealed her secret last year.

Agencies
She was quoted in a women’s magazine saying, “I always pound the potatoes myself with a potato masher, rather than using a puree machine. That way there are still little lumps left in the liquid at the end.” And she prefers to use her home-grown taters.

Royal palate
Prince Philip is known for his fun-loving nature, which makes his culinary cooking choice a perfect match — barbeque. According to Darren McGrady, who worked for the royal family for over a decade, Prince Philip loves to cook out on the grill.

Agencies
But there’s just one thing he can’t stomach — organic food. McGrady said that once Prince Charles had brought over a hamper of organic items, and Prince Phillip “just shook his head and walked out”.


US pigs raised with a taste for -- and of -- whiskey

Twenty-five pigs mill around in open pens on a tiny farm in Woodward, Iowa.

They are fat, robust and being raised to taste of rye whiskey.

Small-batch distillery Templeton Rye is feeding them the mash used in making its distinctive American whiskey, hoping that the rich taste of the grain will grab consumers' attention.

Templeton is especially long on rye, with more than 90 percent of its mash coming from the high-protein grain, and malted barley for the remainder.

The spent mash is folded into the pig feed, making up 20 percent of the ingredients, as advised by a swine nutrition specialist.

The pigs seem to like it, digging into their feed with happy grunts and snorts.

"It smells very good, almost like candy," said Scott Bush, founder and president of Templeton Rye Spirits.

The distillery has chosen for the test the Duroc breed, known for its distinctive auburn winter coat, succulence and heavy muscling.

Bush said the pigs were nearly at their ideal weight for eating: 210 pounds (95 kilos), with just a few weeks to go before heading to the slaughterhouse.

"How much mash is going to affect that taste, we don't know yet," he said.

The possibility that a whiff of whiskey will arise from ham, ribs or chops has whetted the appetites of scores of pork lovers: The distillery has received about 200 orders, from four countries.

Some of the orders for the 25 pigs were accompanied by long letters explaining why the customer desired the pig.

Pigs will be "shipped with head and feet" to customers paying $699 per animal, Bush said.

Aron Mackevicius, the executive chef at the 7M Grill in Omaha, Nebraska, is one of them. He enthusiastically described how he will cut up the pig and create a special menu, from appetizer to dessert.

"My family has a bakery and one of the specialties is the bacon bun," a small, slightly sweet bread stuffed with bacon, he said.

The chef said he hoped the pig "has a bit of a rye flavor" that will make it unique.

"When I first heard about the project I was excited that somebody was taking such a bold move, a very intriguing concept," he said.

According to Bush, the idea sprang up one night as the team chatted over glasses of Templeton Rye.

"All of us are from Iowa," the number-one pork producing state in the country, said Bush.

"But we also go all around the country to these gastro-culinary events, and the culinary world is still dominated by wine.

"But it is changing, especially with whiskey. The idea was that we are going to ask chefs to pair the pigs with cocktails of Templeton Rye."

Their whiskey is based on the recipe used by bootleggers in the tiny town of Templeton during Prohibition, the nearly 14-year period when alcoholic beverages were banned nationwide starting in 1920.

Templeton Rye was the beverage of choice of Chicago mobster and bootlegger Al Capone, Bush said.

"As it was illegal there are not a lot of documents, but a lot of oral history," he said, including from Capone's great-niece.

"Capone mostly sold Canadian whiskey but what he was drinking with friends was Templeton Rye."

It is this heritage the distillery wants to share, extending it through the pigs-to-plate project.

The project is "break-even for the company" but above all is "more of an experiment," Bush said, leaving the door open to doing it again.

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Top Kremlin Pundits Celebrate Mid-Air Takedown of Journo Facing Execution

PETRAS MALUKAS/AFP via Getty ImagesAs many around the world gasped over the outrage taking place in Belarus—where authorities forced down a passenger jet in order to arrest a journalist—pro-Kremlin propagandists were nothing short of delighted about the incident, rejoicing and celebrating in Moscow.On Sunday, Belarusian authorities ordered a Ryanair flight that took off from Athens to land in Minsk under false pretenses—a mere pretext to arrest a journalist on board. Roman Protasevich faces the death penalty after being placed on a “terrorist” list for his reporting on police brutality during anti-government protests in Belarus last year.“Never thought I’d be jealous of Belarus for any reason. But now I’m jealous. Well done, Batka,” tweeted Margarita Simonyan, the head of Russian state-sponsored news outlets RT and Sputnik, using the nickname for Belarusian president Alexander Lukashenko.Journalist Snatched from Flight Faces Belarus ‘Death Penalty’Appearing on the state TV show Sunday Evening with Vladimir Soloviev, Simonyan doubled down on her support for the actions of the Belarusian dictator. “That was brazen. Great job. That’s how it ought to be done. I, for one, support such measures.” In response to media inquiries, Simonyan tweeted a poem that seemed to suggest the journalist “had it coming.”As for the method used to apprehend Protasevich, state TV experts said they’re shocked not by Lukashenko’s tactics—which they described as perfectly normal—but by the reactions from the West.Speaking on Russian state TV show 60 Minutes, political scientist Vladimir Kornilov suggested: “Let's dispatch our Snowden to Cuba for a vacation and see what happens then.” Likewise, Russia’s Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova claimed to be “shocked” not by Lukashenko’s actions, but instead by what she described as “Western hypocrisy” in this regard.Yury Afonin, a member of the State Duma for the Russian Federation, said on 60 Minutes: “Any traitor to their country—and Protasevich is a traitor and terrorist—will be held accountable. It’s unavoidable.” On another show, political scientist Sergey Mikheyev suggested that Russia could learn a thing or two from the Ryanair incident. “[Lukashenko] created an important precedent for us to follow in dealing with such people.”RT’s Margarita Simonyan was excited that the opposition journalist was captured in such a brazen manner. Perhaps unsurprisingly so, given that she is one of the most vocal proponents of the idea that Russia should ban any media that isn’t owned or controlled by the government.On the state media talk show The Right to Know in February, Simonyan said: “All resources and instruments that could be used to influence or alter the mentality of the masses and the mood of society need to be owned by us, by our country.” She added: “The West is in a state of war with Russia—a sanction war at the minimum, information war, hybrid war, etcetera. And yet they’re funding everything tied to the opposition. Should we close down everything Western? Yes, I think so.”To erase any notion of adherence to democratic values, Simonyan clarified: “Why would I see danger in limiting the freedom of speech when I don’t believe in freedom of speech?”During the state media talk show The Evening with Vladimir Soloviev in March, Simonyan urged: “We must cut anyone who is working for their [Western] money out of Russian political life. Everyone. It has to be forbidden through legislation. Do you want to be in politics or media—and media is the same thing as politics—you can’t do that, if you’re receiving even one dollar from over there.” At the same time, Simonyan is adamant that Russian state-funded RT and Sputnik should be able to freely function in Western countries.Russia State Media Gears Up for a War ‘Against the West’Russian President Vladimir Putin isn’t far behind Lukashenko in his quest to silence dissent and eliminate any media coverage that dares to question his authoritarian rule. He falsely claims that Russia’s very survival is in peril, as the West is allegedly scheming to destroy the nation by removing him from his otherwise unending presidency through nefarious means.The Kremlin’s extensive propaganda apparatus is dedicated to painting the United States as a relentless, omnipresent foe. On state-funded media outlet Sputnik this month, Russian Foreign Ministry Spokeswoman Maria Zakharova asserted her belief that the Internet as a whole is secretly controlled by the U.S. government.“It’s a scary snake pit,” Zakharova exclaimed, describing the world wide web as a tool of hybrid warfare used to interfere in the affairs of sovereign nations. The Russian government’s intent to separate the country’s internet from the rest of the world is being portrayed to average Russians as a set of measures that is being implemented for their own good, as opposed to the real beneficiary: Russian President Vladimir Putin.The only solution that is being proposed by the Kremlin to the Russian people is systematic elimination of the internal opposition, along with getting rid of the foreign media operating within Russia’s borders, and the eventual creation of the “sovereign internet,” which would operate separately from the world wide web. The Kremlin’s propagandists are working overtime to convince the citizens that what they really want is less freedom, more oppression, no plurality in media and no change in power. In other words, a surefire formula to ensure that Putin remains president for life.On Sunday Evening with Vladimir Soloviev in March, RT’s Simonyan made an Orwellian claim that the Russian people are not suffering from lack of freedom but are instead unhappy with excessive freedoms being afforded by the government—and should be glad to give them up for the good of the country. On The Evening with Vladimir Soloviev last Tuesday, Russian lawmaker Oleg Morozov advocated arresting people left and right, with no regard for what the West might say or do about it. “There is a war of annihilation being waged against my country,” Morozov claimed, as he urged authorities to crack down on the opposition to prevent an uprising.Girlfriend of Belarusian Activist Also Snatched From Hijacked Commercial FlightWhile opposition leader Alexei Navalny languishes in prison, state media personalities are claiming that the Russians want Putin’s opponents to be crushed in a more violent manner. During his nightly broadcast last Tuesday, state media host Vladimir Soloviev claimed: “Our liberals are pushing the country back to 1937 [Stalin’s year of terror], which would be welcomed by a sizable segment of the population. It could get very bloody.” This message is meant not only to feed the worst instincts of the masses, but also to deter any internal opposition, while the external influence is systematically uprooted.Describing the effect of Foreign Agent Registration Act (FARA), Margarita Simonyan claimed last year that RT’s U.S.-based reporters are being “subjected to horrific pressure from their media, their names are being published, they are being shamed, influence is being exerted upon their friends and their family.” She shamelessly contended: “No normal person could possibly like a monopoly in media. That kind of monopoly leads to fallacies and mistakes. And when the matter at hand pertains to geopolitics and the world order, fallacies and mistakes can be deadly.”As Roman Protasevich likely faces torture at the hands of Lukashenko's regime, Russian state TV hosts and experts pointed out with cruel glee that he will be forced to provide information about supposedly being funded by Western intelligence agencies, further enforcing the illusion that anyone who dares to question the government is a foreign-funded “traitor.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

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Home baking Japanese shokupan (white bread)

In Japan they have this really fluffy, Wonderbread-style loaf that they call shokupan. It’s basically freshly baked white bread except more exotic because the recipe is from Japan. I’ve been into baking lately so I decided to make my own.

When I was starting out I used a recipe from Ethan Chlebowski and another from Kitchen Princess Bamboo. I actually preferred the latter, even though it didn’t include egg or the additional tangzhong step, which is a roux made from flour and water.

I even bought this book about shokupan at Kinokuniya, the local Japanese bookstore. It has great instructional photos and takes the most intensive, handmade approach, but the recipe is still roughly the same as below.

Here is the rough recipe with the ingredients listed as a percent of the flour, by weight:

  • Bread flour
  • Milk and water (68-72%)
  • Sugar (5-10%)
  • Salt (2%)
  • Yeast (0.3-1.3%)
  • Butter (5%)

Mix ingredients until they come together into a ball. Add in butter, knead again. Once the dough comes together in a ball and passes the “windowpane test“, proof it for an hour. After that, shape the loaf by rolling it into a loaf the length of your loaf pan (think of the shape of a cinnamon roll, only fatter).

Once the bread has risen nearly to the top of the pan, bake it for 25-28 mins at 390 F or 30 mins at 375 F.

These recipes sometimes include egg, dried milk, or other additives. Some recipes use a tangzhong, which is a roux made from flour and water, though I’ve found it makes the dough even stickier than normal.

I tried several methods for working the dough:1. Our vintage Sumbeam mixer. The dough climbed the hooks and ended up inside the mixer, which took hours to clean out. I don’t recommend it.2. By hand, in a bowl or on the counter. High hydration dough sticks to everything, particularly your hands. I may try this again but it was a mess the first few times.3. The food processor. This was recommended in Bread Illustrated from America’s Test Kitchen and it actually works well as long as the dough is around 70% hydration or lower.

The biggest adjustment when making bread is the waiting. The first rise is roughly an hour, then you shape the dough and put it into the Pullman loaf pan and wait another hour. That’s the bare minimum. Some recipes have two rises or even rest the dough overnight, which lets it rise more slowly and develop more gluten and flavor.

After all the waiting, we’ve had some great bread lately and I will keep making more.


60+ Best Summer Drinks to Keep You Refreshed After a Hot Day

Keep your pitchers filled with these treats, from sweet lemonade to spicy margaritas.

When you're spending a Saturday by the backyard (inflatable) pool, cooking up a family barbecue, or just relaxing in the hammock after mowing the lawn, you need a cool drink in hand to complete the moment, whether it's a refreshing cocktail or simply a batch of ice-cold lemonade or tea. But that drink doesn't have to be boring, which is why we've put together this list of our favorite easy, elevated summer drinks.

Whether you're looking to make a quick cocktail for one or a big pitcher of frozen drinks to share, these alcoholic and non-alcoholic recipes will be the perfect addition to any lazy weekend afternoon. There are plenty of options for every taste, depending on what you're looking for, from sweet, fruity drinks ideal for cooling off after a hot day, to stiff, bourbon-based drinks that pair well with a backyard barbecue.

If you're whipping up some picnic recipes, there are a few big-batch drinks you can bring to dole out to your guests. Try the Sweet Tea Sangria or the Rosé Dogwood Punch that will travel well and taste delicious shared with friends. Or, if you're coming up with some summer dinner ideas for enjoying a weeknight meal with your family on your back porch, you can make several recipes kid-friendly, such as the Basil Lemonade, the Strawberry Punch, or the Mango Sunrise Piña Colada. Just give these a peruse, and stock up on supplies, and you'll be all set.

This twist on a sour works especially well with smoky mezcal. For the very freshest mint, try growing your own. (It's easier than you think!)

Another great way to use mint, this sweet herbal sipper can be left virgin -- or add an ounce of bourbon for a cool take on a hot toddy.

Named after F. Scott Fitzgerald's golden girl, this elegant drink doesn't need lavish parties. It'll make itself at home anywhere.

This deliciously refreshing combo couldn't be easier to make&mdashor to drink, so go slowly!

We're pretty sure it's just not summer unless there's a big ol' pitcher of lemonade in the fridge. But you don't have to just stick with lemons! Here, we've got seven different elegant combinations in addition to the classic, including blueberry thyme, jalapeño, and lavender rosemary.

This sweetly refreshing berry punch is kid-friendly, from the star-shaped fruit, to the non-alcoholic base. You can also adult it up with a little rum or vodka.

Shake up two simple ingredients and garnish with a sprig of mint for a refreshing summer sipper.

This beautiful pitcher drink couldn't be easier to make. And the bright flavor gives spiked lemonade a run for its money.

Fresh berries and garden basil are a winning combo, but you can give this backyard staple a boozy twist with some gin or vodka as well.

Ideal for a summer picnic, this fruity, lemony punch is just what you'll want on a scorching summer day.

Whether for a 4th of July celebration or just an outdoor party, a pitcher of this sparkling drink will fit any occasion this summer.

Blackberry jam gives this light summer sip a sweet kick, especially against the gin base.

This tangy drink is made with homemade jalapeño-infused tequila, making it the sweet-and-spicy concoction of your dreams.

This spiked sweet tea features peaches raspberries and a big splash of white wine!

This Southern staple never goes out of style and always tastes refreshing.

Transform your favorite Southern soda into a boozy treat with a splash of bourbon whiskey.

When you ever say no to a daiquiri?

Add a splash of rum to reveal this sunny refresher's after-dark potential.

Some of your favorite fall flavors make a comeback in this refreshing sangria.

Bryan Dayton, beverage director at Oak at Fourteenth in Boulder, Colorado, spruces up the classic Gin Rickey by adding fresh summer raspberries.

Just in time for the Kentucky Derby, chef Edward Lee rouses the state's classic cocktail with a homemade jalapeño simple syrup.

Stay refreshed and cool all summer long with this delicious strawberry and blueberry sangria. Perfect for sitting on the porch or your next summer BBQ.

This pitcher-style party drink is likely to be the most colorful drink you'll have this summer!

This light, fresh cocktail is filled with sweet berries, peaches, and just enough bubbly to feel festive.

This drink skips sugary triple sec, instead gaining its flavor from fresh lime juice, agave syrup, orange zest, and mint&mdashfor a savings of 80 calories per cocktail.

This cocktail recipe comes from Joe Campanale, beverage director and co-owner of dell'Anima in New York City.

This spritzer combines the tastes of the cooler season with the refreshing fizz of warmer weather drinks.

Fresh, sweet strawberries and fragrant basil make this simple cocktail taste like summertime in a glass.

Alabama chef David Bancroft devised Bellini Moonshiners&mdasha high-low mix of fancy Champagne and Lincoln County Lightning Whiskey. Fresh peaches and basil add a taste of summer.

This light and refreshing white wine-based cocktail gets a subtle sweetness from elderflower liqueur. It's easy to mix up the base ahead of time and quickly serve as guests arrive.

Roasted beets add a distinctive earthy quality to the classic Bloody Mary.

You can easily make this fizzy lemonade for non-drinkers by just skipping the vodka while keeping the unique infusion of basil.

Get the recipe at Unusually Lovely.

Transport yourself to a tropical getaway with this frozen coconut pineapple treat.

Get the recipe at The Sweetest Occasion.

You can make this sweet sip in just a few steps, using fresh raspberries and lemon juice.

Get the recipe at Purely Katie.

Don't be fooled by the pretty layers&mdashthis vodka and lemonade concoction packs a strong punch!

Get the recipe at Delish.

Sweet meets salty with this vodka, gin, and grapefruit concoction&mdashmade all the more satisfying in frozen form.

Get the recipe at A Beautiful Mess.

It doesn't take much to give your go-to G&T the summer treatment&mdashjust a few fresh blackberries and cucumber slices.

Get the recipe at The Wooden Skillet.

Cool down and booze up with this frozen concoction that tastes great all year.

Get the recipe at Delish.

With just four fresh ingredients and an unbeatably light taste, expect every round to be gone faster than you can say, "Who needs refills?"

Get the recipe at Sugar and Charm.

It's not summer without at least one round of daiquiris, so quench your thirst with this delightful frozen cocktail.

Get the recipe at Jelly Toast.

Lazy porch nights practically demand a spiked Arnold Palmer in hand, especially when bourbon and peach liqueur get involved.

Get the recipe at Kleinworth and Co.

There are spicy margs, and then there's this sweet, summer-friendly rendition that you'll want to sip all season.

Get the recipe at Domesticate Me.

One taste of this fruity summer cocktail and you'll be transported to a beach somewhere far, far away.

Get the recipe at The Sweetest Occasion.

Have your drink and eat it too. Let a booze-infused popsicle soak in your sparkling wine while you sip, then enjoy the adult-friendly treat once your glass is empty.

Get the recipe at Ready to Yumble.

It wouldn't be a summer cocktail list without mention of rosé or lemonade, so why not combine the seasonal staples into one delicious drink?

Get the recipe at Spices in My DNA.

Cucumber vodka, watermelon, and limes meet to create what will quickly become one of your favorite poolside drinks.

Get the recipe at Creative Culinary.

What do you get when you mix tea with white wine and fruit? A must-have summer cocktail.

Get the recipe at The Wicked Noodle.

This drink will take your taste buds on a trip to the tropics.

Get the recipe at Crazy for Crust.

All you need is five minutes to whip up this refreshing citrus drink.

Get the recipe at Damn Delicious.

Use fresh fruit to make this delicious twist on sangria.

Get the recipe at What the Fork.

Cool off with a cocktail so good, it's been pinned over 50,000 times.

Get the recipe at Baking Beauty.

This cocktail is as refreshing as it is pretty.

Get the recipe at The Chunky Chef.

Mix everything ahead of time but wait until serving time to add the chilled Prosecco.

Get the recipe at Take Two Tapas.

Fresh cherries, vanilla extract, and bourbon&mdashyum!

Get the recipe at Sweet Peas and Saffron.

Spruce up a basic Moscow Mule recipe with peach-flavored vodka&mdashand don't forget the fresh basil garnish!


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