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Food Delivery Driver Harasses Female Customer via Text Messages

Food Delivery Driver Harasses Female Customer via Text Messages


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A 33-year-old in the U.K. Michelle Midwinter, from Gloucestershire in England, posted screenshots of what she claims to be the WhatsApp conversation between her and a Just Eat driver.

He said he was “a fan,” inquired about her relationship status, called her "baby," and said “see you next time when I get your meal,” followed by a kiss emoji.

At first, the alarmed Briton was hesitant to complain about the man’s inappropriate behavior out of fear of repercussion from the driver, who had her name, address, and phone number.

Just a snippet of Just Eat’s response to my receiving unsolicited messages from the guy who had just delivered my food. Nice one Just Eat! Apart from him using my number in this way surely being in breach of privacy laws etc, they don’t really seem to take it seriously do they?? pic.twitter.com/OVZkl0IW5f

— Michelle Midwinter (@ShelbyTree) January 15, 2018

“If he ended up getting fired over this, who knows what he would do with my information as he clearly had no qualms over using it in the first place,” she wrote on Twitter.

Eventually, she reached out to Just Eat over the app’s live chat, where a customer service representative named Trixie simply offered a £10 coupon (roughly $14).

“We are appalled by the way this was handled when the customer initially made contact with our customer care team. This lacked empathy and does not reflect our policies or the way Just Eat would expect something like this to be dealt with,” Just Eat told The Daily Meal. “We have established procedures for dealing with customer complaints including escalations and compliance teams who will step in if an issue is not resolved satisfactorily on first contact.”

Of the intrusive delivery driver, the company said: “This driver has acted in a way that does not represent Just Eat and our core values. We are investigating this with our restaurant partner and are also speaking to this customer offline and if the customer decides this is a criminal matter and reports it to the police, we will of course assist the police with any investigation.”

Midwinter confirmed on Twitter that a Just Eat managing director phoned her for a “very long chat” about the incident.

“They are indeed accepting responsibility and are deeply apologetic about the way this was initially handled and it has ‘shaken them to the core,’” she wrote. “We spoke about the big changes there will be and how these will be implemented. I believe they are taking this extremely seriously and I hope this will pave the way for national changes to the way our data is protected, and more importantly how females are protected.”

1/2 The Managing Director of Just Eat phoned me today and we had a very long chat about the situation. They are indeed accepting responsibility and are deeply apologetic about the way this was initially handled and it has “shaken them to the core.” We spoke about the big...

— Michelle Midwinter (@ShelbyTree) January 16, 2018

2/2 Changes there will be and how these will be implemented. I believe they are taking this extremely seriously and I hope this will pave the way for national changes to the way our data is protected, and more importantly how females are protected

— Michelle Midwinter (@ShelbyTree) January 16, 2018

As upsetting as the incident was, after her post went viral Midwinter learned that her situation is not as rare as she might hope. “I’ve been contacted hundreds of times with similar stories,” she tweeted. “It’s happening EVERYWHERE!”

I put in On Twitter because I didn’t get an adequate response and well..... now I’m certainly getting a response! This has gone beyond my personal experience - I’ve been contacted hundreds of times with similar stories! It’s happening EVERYWHERE!

— Michelle Midwinter (@ShelbyTree) January 16, 2018

For more accounts of indecency in the food world, here are the 9 most memorable crimes that went down at fast food restaurants.


Sexual harassment and the sharing economy: the dark side of working for strangers

Women working for companies like Uber and DoorDash say they have been groped, threatened and harassed by customers. Their stories highlight how technology connects strangers – and opens the door for abuse

Wed 23 Aug 2017 11.00 BST Last modified on Wed 23 Aug 2017 20.04 BST

When a male customer grabbed Melissa’s breast, she didn’t bother reporting it to DoorDash, the on-demand food delivery service that hired her as a driver.

She didn’t think the company would care. When a different customer had sexually harassed her a month earlier – texting her a pornographic video through the app – DoorDash did little to help, she said. The company canceled the order, but allowed the man to continue sending her multiple messages.

“I felt very fearful. I felt very alone,” said Melissa, 32, who asked to use only her first name. “I questioned whether I wanted to continue to do this, but I’m financially dependent on it. This is my income.”

In recent months, Silicon Valley has faced widespread backlash surrounding the sexual misconduct and discrimination that some say is rampant in the male-dominated tech industry.

But almost entirely overlooked amid the public outrage is the massive pool of low-wage workers – especially in the sharing economy – who are vulnerable to a wide range of abuses on the job because they lack basic labor rights.

And while corporate scandals continue to make headlines – most recently involving a Google engineer’s memo criticizing diversity initiatives – there has been minimal scrutiny of the harassment, abuse and discrimination the tech products have enabled by connecting strangers through the internet. That includes sexual assaults of Uber drivers and food deliverers, physical attacks and racist abuse by Airbnb hosts, and violent threats on Twitter, Facebook and dating apps.

“We have to talk about this as a problem these platforms have created,” said Mary Anne Franks, a University of Miami law professor who studies online abuse. “[If you’re] going to set up a platform to make it possible for people to instantaneously communicate with people they don’t know . you know full well it’s going to be abused and weaponized.”


Sexual harassment and the sharing economy: the dark side of working for strangers

Women working for companies like Uber and DoorDash say they have been groped, threatened and harassed by customers. Their stories highlight how technology connects strangers – and opens the door for abuse

Wed 23 Aug 2017 11.00 BST Last modified on Wed 23 Aug 2017 20.04 BST

When a male customer grabbed Melissa’s breast, she didn’t bother reporting it to DoorDash, the on-demand food delivery service that hired her as a driver.

She didn’t think the company would care. When a different customer had sexually harassed her a month earlier – texting her a pornographic video through the app – DoorDash did little to help, she said. The company canceled the order, but allowed the man to continue sending her multiple messages.

“I felt very fearful. I felt very alone,” said Melissa, 32, who asked to use only her first name. “I questioned whether I wanted to continue to do this, but I’m financially dependent on it. This is my income.”

In recent months, Silicon Valley has faced widespread backlash surrounding the sexual misconduct and discrimination that some say is rampant in the male-dominated tech industry.

But almost entirely overlooked amid the public outrage is the massive pool of low-wage workers – especially in the sharing economy – who are vulnerable to a wide range of abuses on the job because they lack basic labor rights.

And while corporate scandals continue to make headlines – most recently involving a Google engineer’s memo criticizing diversity initiatives – there has been minimal scrutiny of the harassment, abuse and discrimination the tech products have enabled by connecting strangers through the internet. That includes sexual assaults of Uber drivers and food deliverers, physical attacks and racist abuse by Airbnb hosts, and violent threats on Twitter, Facebook and dating apps.

“We have to talk about this as a problem these platforms have created,” said Mary Anne Franks, a University of Miami law professor who studies online abuse. “[If you’re] going to set up a platform to make it possible for people to instantaneously communicate with people they don’t know . you know full well it’s going to be abused and weaponized.”


Sexual harassment and the sharing economy: the dark side of working for strangers

Women working for companies like Uber and DoorDash say they have been groped, threatened and harassed by customers. Their stories highlight how technology connects strangers – and opens the door for abuse

Wed 23 Aug 2017 11.00 BST Last modified on Wed 23 Aug 2017 20.04 BST

When a male customer grabbed Melissa’s breast, she didn’t bother reporting it to DoorDash, the on-demand food delivery service that hired her as a driver.

She didn’t think the company would care. When a different customer had sexually harassed her a month earlier – texting her a pornographic video through the app – DoorDash did little to help, she said. The company canceled the order, but allowed the man to continue sending her multiple messages.

“I felt very fearful. I felt very alone,” said Melissa, 32, who asked to use only her first name. “I questioned whether I wanted to continue to do this, but I’m financially dependent on it. This is my income.”

In recent months, Silicon Valley has faced widespread backlash surrounding the sexual misconduct and discrimination that some say is rampant in the male-dominated tech industry.

But almost entirely overlooked amid the public outrage is the massive pool of low-wage workers – especially in the sharing economy – who are vulnerable to a wide range of abuses on the job because they lack basic labor rights.

And while corporate scandals continue to make headlines – most recently involving a Google engineer’s memo criticizing diversity initiatives – there has been minimal scrutiny of the harassment, abuse and discrimination the tech products have enabled by connecting strangers through the internet. That includes sexual assaults of Uber drivers and food deliverers, physical attacks and racist abuse by Airbnb hosts, and violent threats on Twitter, Facebook and dating apps.

“We have to talk about this as a problem these platforms have created,” said Mary Anne Franks, a University of Miami law professor who studies online abuse. “[If you’re] going to set up a platform to make it possible for people to instantaneously communicate with people they don’t know . you know full well it’s going to be abused and weaponized.”


Sexual harassment and the sharing economy: the dark side of working for strangers

Women working for companies like Uber and DoorDash say they have been groped, threatened and harassed by customers. Their stories highlight how technology connects strangers – and opens the door for abuse

Wed 23 Aug 2017 11.00 BST Last modified on Wed 23 Aug 2017 20.04 BST

When a male customer grabbed Melissa’s breast, she didn’t bother reporting it to DoorDash, the on-demand food delivery service that hired her as a driver.

She didn’t think the company would care. When a different customer had sexually harassed her a month earlier – texting her a pornographic video through the app – DoorDash did little to help, she said. The company canceled the order, but allowed the man to continue sending her multiple messages.

“I felt very fearful. I felt very alone,” said Melissa, 32, who asked to use only her first name. “I questioned whether I wanted to continue to do this, but I’m financially dependent on it. This is my income.”

In recent months, Silicon Valley has faced widespread backlash surrounding the sexual misconduct and discrimination that some say is rampant in the male-dominated tech industry.

But almost entirely overlooked amid the public outrage is the massive pool of low-wage workers – especially in the sharing economy – who are vulnerable to a wide range of abuses on the job because they lack basic labor rights.

And while corporate scandals continue to make headlines – most recently involving a Google engineer’s memo criticizing diversity initiatives – there has been minimal scrutiny of the harassment, abuse and discrimination the tech products have enabled by connecting strangers through the internet. That includes sexual assaults of Uber drivers and food deliverers, physical attacks and racist abuse by Airbnb hosts, and violent threats on Twitter, Facebook and dating apps.

“We have to talk about this as a problem these platforms have created,” said Mary Anne Franks, a University of Miami law professor who studies online abuse. “[If you’re] going to set up a platform to make it possible for people to instantaneously communicate with people they don’t know . you know full well it’s going to be abused and weaponized.”


Sexual harassment and the sharing economy: the dark side of working for strangers

Women working for companies like Uber and DoorDash say they have been groped, threatened and harassed by customers. Their stories highlight how technology connects strangers – and opens the door for abuse

Wed 23 Aug 2017 11.00 BST Last modified on Wed 23 Aug 2017 20.04 BST

When a male customer grabbed Melissa’s breast, she didn’t bother reporting it to DoorDash, the on-demand food delivery service that hired her as a driver.

She didn’t think the company would care. When a different customer had sexually harassed her a month earlier – texting her a pornographic video through the app – DoorDash did little to help, she said. The company canceled the order, but allowed the man to continue sending her multiple messages.

“I felt very fearful. I felt very alone,” said Melissa, 32, who asked to use only her first name. “I questioned whether I wanted to continue to do this, but I’m financially dependent on it. This is my income.”

In recent months, Silicon Valley has faced widespread backlash surrounding the sexual misconduct and discrimination that some say is rampant in the male-dominated tech industry.

But almost entirely overlooked amid the public outrage is the massive pool of low-wage workers – especially in the sharing economy – who are vulnerable to a wide range of abuses on the job because they lack basic labor rights.

And while corporate scandals continue to make headlines – most recently involving a Google engineer’s memo criticizing diversity initiatives – there has been minimal scrutiny of the harassment, abuse and discrimination the tech products have enabled by connecting strangers through the internet. That includes sexual assaults of Uber drivers and food deliverers, physical attacks and racist abuse by Airbnb hosts, and violent threats on Twitter, Facebook and dating apps.

“We have to talk about this as a problem these platforms have created,” said Mary Anne Franks, a University of Miami law professor who studies online abuse. “[If you’re] going to set up a platform to make it possible for people to instantaneously communicate with people they don’t know . you know full well it’s going to be abused and weaponized.”


Sexual harassment and the sharing economy: the dark side of working for strangers

Women working for companies like Uber and DoorDash say they have been groped, threatened and harassed by customers. Their stories highlight how technology connects strangers – and opens the door for abuse

Wed 23 Aug 2017 11.00 BST Last modified on Wed 23 Aug 2017 20.04 BST

When a male customer grabbed Melissa’s breast, she didn’t bother reporting it to DoorDash, the on-demand food delivery service that hired her as a driver.

She didn’t think the company would care. When a different customer had sexually harassed her a month earlier – texting her a pornographic video through the app – DoorDash did little to help, she said. The company canceled the order, but allowed the man to continue sending her multiple messages.

“I felt very fearful. I felt very alone,” said Melissa, 32, who asked to use only her first name. “I questioned whether I wanted to continue to do this, but I’m financially dependent on it. This is my income.”

In recent months, Silicon Valley has faced widespread backlash surrounding the sexual misconduct and discrimination that some say is rampant in the male-dominated tech industry.

But almost entirely overlooked amid the public outrage is the massive pool of low-wage workers – especially in the sharing economy – who are vulnerable to a wide range of abuses on the job because they lack basic labor rights.

And while corporate scandals continue to make headlines – most recently involving a Google engineer’s memo criticizing diversity initiatives – there has been minimal scrutiny of the harassment, abuse and discrimination the tech products have enabled by connecting strangers through the internet. That includes sexual assaults of Uber drivers and food deliverers, physical attacks and racist abuse by Airbnb hosts, and violent threats on Twitter, Facebook and dating apps.

“We have to talk about this as a problem these platforms have created,” said Mary Anne Franks, a University of Miami law professor who studies online abuse. “[If you’re] going to set up a platform to make it possible for people to instantaneously communicate with people they don’t know . you know full well it’s going to be abused and weaponized.”


Sexual harassment and the sharing economy: the dark side of working for strangers

Women working for companies like Uber and DoorDash say they have been groped, threatened and harassed by customers. Their stories highlight how technology connects strangers – and opens the door for abuse

Wed 23 Aug 2017 11.00 BST Last modified on Wed 23 Aug 2017 20.04 BST

When a male customer grabbed Melissa’s breast, she didn’t bother reporting it to DoorDash, the on-demand food delivery service that hired her as a driver.

She didn’t think the company would care. When a different customer had sexually harassed her a month earlier – texting her a pornographic video through the app – DoorDash did little to help, she said. The company canceled the order, but allowed the man to continue sending her multiple messages.

“I felt very fearful. I felt very alone,” said Melissa, 32, who asked to use only her first name. “I questioned whether I wanted to continue to do this, but I’m financially dependent on it. This is my income.”

In recent months, Silicon Valley has faced widespread backlash surrounding the sexual misconduct and discrimination that some say is rampant in the male-dominated tech industry.

But almost entirely overlooked amid the public outrage is the massive pool of low-wage workers – especially in the sharing economy – who are vulnerable to a wide range of abuses on the job because they lack basic labor rights.

And while corporate scandals continue to make headlines – most recently involving a Google engineer’s memo criticizing diversity initiatives – there has been minimal scrutiny of the harassment, abuse and discrimination the tech products have enabled by connecting strangers through the internet. That includes sexual assaults of Uber drivers and food deliverers, physical attacks and racist abuse by Airbnb hosts, and violent threats on Twitter, Facebook and dating apps.

“We have to talk about this as a problem these platforms have created,” said Mary Anne Franks, a University of Miami law professor who studies online abuse. “[If you’re] going to set up a platform to make it possible for people to instantaneously communicate with people they don’t know . you know full well it’s going to be abused and weaponized.”


Sexual harassment and the sharing economy: the dark side of working for strangers

Women working for companies like Uber and DoorDash say they have been groped, threatened and harassed by customers. Their stories highlight how technology connects strangers – and opens the door for abuse

Wed 23 Aug 2017 11.00 BST Last modified on Wed 23 Aug 2017 20.04 BST

When a male customer grabbed Melissa’s breast, she didn’t bother reporting it to DoorDash, the on-demand food delivery service that hired her as a driver.

She didn’t think the company would care. When a different customer had sexually harassed her a month earlier – texting her a pornographic video through the app – DoorDash did little to help, she said. The company canceled the order, but allowed the man to continue sending her multiple messages.

“I felt very fearful. I felt very alone,” said Melissa, 32, who asked to use only her first name. “I questioned whether I wanted to continue to do this, but I’m financially dependent on it. This is my income.”

In recent months, Silicon Valley has faced widespread backlash surrounding the sexual misconduct and discrimination that some say is rampant in the male-dominated tech industry.

But almost entirely overlooked amid the public outrage is the massive pool of low-wage workers – especially in the sharing economy – who are vulnerable to a wide range of abuses on the job because they lack basic labor rights.

And while corporate scandals continue to make headlines – most recently involving a Google engineer’s memo criticizing diversity initiatives – there has been minimal scrutiny of the harassment, abuse and discrimination the tech products have enabled by connecting strangers through the internet. That includes sexual assaults of Uber drivers and food deliverers, physical attacks and racist abuse by Airbnb hosts, and violent threats on Twitter, Facebook and dating apps.

“We have to talk about this as a problem these platforms have created,” said Mary Anne Franks, a University of Miami law professor who studies online abuse. “[If you’re] going to set up a platform to make it possible for people to instantaneously communicate with people they don’t know . you know full well it’s going to be abused and weaponized.”


Sexual harassment and the sharing economy: the dark side of working for strangers

Women working for companies like Uber and DoorDash say they have been groped, threatened and harassed by customers. Their stories highlight how technology connects strangers – and opens the door for abuse

Wed 23 Aug 2017 11.00 BST Last modified on Wed 23 Aug 2017 20.04 BST

When a male customer grabbed Melissa’s breast, she didn’t bother reporting it to DoorDash, the on-demand food delivery service that hired her as a driver.

She didn’t think the company would care. When a different customer had sexually harassed her a month earlier – texting her a pornographic video through the app – DoorDash did little to help, she said. The company canceled the order, but allowed the man to continue sending her multiple messages.

“I felt very fearful. I felt very alone,” said Melissa, 32, who asked to use only her first name. “I questioned whether I wanted to continue to do this, but I’m financially dependent on it. This is my income.”

In recent months, Silicon Valley has faced widespread backlash surrounding the sexual misconduct and discrimination that some say is rampant in the male-dominated tech industry.

But almost entirely overlooked amid the public outrage is the massive pool of low-wage workers – especially in the sharing economy – who are vulnerable to a wide range of abuses on the job because they lack basic labor rights.

And while corporate scandals continue to make headlines – most recently involving a Google engineer’s memo criticizing diversity initiatives – there has been minimal scrutiny of the harassment, abuse and discrimination the tech products have enabled by connecting strangers through the internet. That includes sexual assaults of Uber drivers and food deliverers, physical attacks and racist abuse by Airbnb hosts, and violent threats on Twitter, Facebook and dating apps.

“We have to talk about this as a problem these platforms have created,” said Mary Anne Franks, a University of Miami law professor who studies online abuse. “[If you’re] going to set up a platform to make it possible for people to instantaneously communicate with people they don’t know . you know full well it’s going to be abused and weaponized.”


Sexual harassment and the sharing economy: the dark side of working for strangers

Women working for companies like Uber and DoorDash say they have been groped, threatened and harassed by customers. Their stories highlight how technology connects strangers – and opens the door for abuse

Wed 23 Aug 2017 11.00 BST Last modified on Wed 23 Aug 2017 20.04 BST

When a male customer grabbed Melissa’s breast, she didn’t bother reporting it to DoorDash, the on-demand food delivery service that hired her as a driver.

She didn’t think the company would care. When a different customer had sexually harassed her a month earlier – texting her a pornographic video through the app – DoorDash did little to help, she said. The company canceled the order, but allowed the man to continue sending her multiple messages.

“I felt very fearful. I felt very alone,” said Melissa, 32, who asked to use only her first name. “I questioned whether I wanted to continue to do this, but I’m financially dependent on it. This is my income.”

In recent months, Silicon Valley has faced widespread backlash surrounding the sexual misconduct and discrimination that some say is rampant in the male-dominated tech industry.

But almost entirely overlooked amid the public outrage is the massive pool of low-wage workers – especially in the sharing economy – who are vulnerable to a wide range of abuses on the job because they lack basic labor rights.

And while corporate scandals continue to make headlines – most recently involving a Google engineer’s memo criticizing diversity initiatives – there has been minimal scrutiny of the harassment, abuse and discrimination the tech products have enabled by connecting strangers through the internet. That includes sexual assaults of Uber drivers and food deliverers, physical attacks and racist abuse by Airbnb hosts, and violent threats on Twitter, Facebook and dating apps.

“We have to talk about this as a problem these platforms have created,” said Mary Anne Franks, a University of Miami law professor who studies online abuse. “[If you’re] going to set up a platform to make it possible for people to instantaneously communicate with people they don’t know . you know full well it’s going to be abused and weaponized.”


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