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Baker's Guide to Chocolate

Baker's Guide to Chocolate


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Chocolate, or as I like to refer to it, heaven on earth, is produced from the beans found inside large pods that grow on cacao trees. These trees are found only within 20 degrees of the equator. Cacao (pronounced ka-kow) farms in exotic places like the Ivory Coast of Africa, Indonesia, and Columbia grow the chocolate for the entire world. Each area produces pods with very distinct flavors (think regional, like wine, where the most astute palates can detect the terroir). But to us everyday consumers and lovers of chocolate, it is more about the amount of pure chocolate included in the mix.

To start the process, the cocoa beans are removed from the pods, dried, fermented, roasted, and then crushed and processed. The cocoa butter is removed leaving “chocolate liquor.”

The cocoa butter is then added back to the liquor in various amounts to make different types of chocolate. Sugar and flavorings are also added to create flavored or market-appealing varieties.

The most common types of chocolate and their components include:

  • Cocoa powder has a range of 10 to 25% cocoa butter added back to the liquor. Unsweetened cocoa powder is used in baking cakes, cookies, and in puddings and pie fillings.
  • Unsweetened chocolate, or baker's chocolate, has only about 5% cocoa butter added back. Bakers chocolate is also used in baked goods and desserts.
  • Bittersweet chocolate is hugely popular and can have a range of 15 to 50% cocoa butter added to the liquor. Sometimes a small percent of sugar or flavorings are added. Bittersweet chocolate is extremely popular for eating out of hand or added to baked goods and desserts for deeper chocolate flavor.
  • Semi-sweet chocolate has about 15% cocoa butter and about 40% sugar added. Think chocolate chips for cookies and such.
  • Milk chocolate has only 10% chocolate liquor, about 20% cocoa butter, about 50% sugar, and about 15% milk solids, plus various flavorings and emulsifiers added. Milk chocolate is probably the most popular chocolate in America for eating straight from the wrapper.
  • White chocolate doesn’t include ANY amount of chocolate liquor. In fact, it is made from cocoa butter, milk, flavorings, and sugar. It’s a mystery to me why anyone would want to eat white chocolate, but they do.

Bakers Chocolate Recipes

Whether you are dreaming of buttery shortbread for an afternoon snack, a luscious berry pie for a midsummer get-together, a buche de Noel for a Christmas Day buffet, or a batch of rolls for Sunday supper, you will discover how to make it in these pages. The recipes are organized into eight comprehensive chapters: Cookies and Bars Muffins and Quick Breads Coffee Cakes, Scones, and Biscuits Cakes and Tortes Pies and Tarts Yeasted Breads Fruit Desserts and Custards and Egg Dishes. Each chapter provides an array of flavor options to match the seasons and to accommodate a variety of tastes. Every recipe includes a photograph of the finished dish, so you can see how it will look, as well as photographs illustrating key baking task, ingredients, and/or equipment.

Classics enjoyed by adults and kids alike are here, such as lemon bars, chocolate-studded cookies, blueberry muffins with brown-sugar topping, buttermilk biscuits, birthday cake with fudge frosting, pumpkin pie, and country-style cinnamon rolls. Detailed directions for baking chocolate cupcakes, bagels, and madeleines make these typical bakery specialties easy to prepare at home. A large selection of recipes for special occasions, such as almond-flecked chocolate cake with caramel sauce, pear torte with fresh ginger, and cherry cheesecake with a biscotti crust, provides plenty of ideas for holiday and dinner-party tables. Rounding out the book are dozens of recipes for savory baked items, from Roquefort-laced popovers and goat cheese muffins to olive bread and mushroom quiche.

An extensive reference section at the end of the book includes basic recipes, such as pie and tart doughs, dessert sauces and glazes, and cake frostings and fillings. Also included is a tips-and-techniques primer, with photographed step-by-step instructions on everything from rolling out pie dough, making decorative crusts, and frosting a cake to kneading bread dough in a stand mixer. Cooking and ingredient charts and a comprehensive glossary complete the section.

With The Williams-Sonoma Baking Book on your kitchen shelf, you will find yourself baking more often, with results that are always both delicious and rewarding.

Chocolate Cheesecake Surprise

a crustless no bake chocolate tofu cheesecake.

Topped with fresh raspberries and shaved chocolate.

1 packet unflavored gelatine
1 1/4lb silken (soft) tofu
8 oz soy cream cheese
4 oz caster (superfine) sugar
2 tsp vanilla extract
8 oz Bakers Dark Chocolate, melted and cooled
8 oz fresh strawberries or raspberries

1. Grease a 9" springform pan and line the base with parchment paper.
2. Melt the chocolate over a double boiler (place a heat-proof bowl set over a pan of simmering water). Once chocolate is melted, set aside and cool.
3. Sprinkle the gelatine over 1/4 cup warm water in a small bowl, leave until the gelatine is spongy – DO NOT STIR. Bring a small saucepan of water to a boil, remove from heat and place the bowl with gelatine in the pan. The water should come halfway up the side of the bowl. Now stir the gelatine until clear and dissolved.
4. Place the tofu, soy cream cheese, sugar, extract, melted chocolate and gelatine in a food processor or blender and blend until smooth. Pour the filling into the prepared pan and refrigerate for a minimum of 6 hours or overnight until set.
5. Garnish with fresh berries and shaved chocolate.

The spiral-bound Jell-O, Cool Whip, Philadelphia Cream Cheese, Baker’s Chocolate 3 Books in 1 cookbook lies flat when opened, so making your favorite desserts is even easier. Try classic desserts like Triple-Layer Lemon Meringue Pie, Marble Brownies, Black Forest Cheesecake, Hot Fudge Sauce, New York Cheesecake, and Oreo Ice Cream Pie, and favorite appetizers like Mexican Dip, Savory Bruschetta, and Party Cheese Ball.

Check out the Table of Contents and some Sample Recipes from the Jell-O, Cool Whip, Philadelphia Cream Cheese, Baker’s Chocolate 3 Books in 1 cookbook.


Baker's Guide to Chocolate

Chocolate, or as I like to refer to it, heaven on earth, is produced from the beans found inside large pods that grow on cacao trees. These trees are found only within 20 degrees of the equator. Cacao (pronounced ka-kow) farms in exotic places like the Ivory Coast of Africa, Indonesia, and Columbia grow the chocolate for the entire world. Each area produces pods with very distinct flavors (think regional, like wine, where the most astute palates can detect the terroir). But to us everyday consumers and lovers of chocolate, it is more about the amount of pure chocolate included in the mix.

To start the process, the cocoa beans are removed from the pods, dried, fermented, roasted, and then crushed and processed. The cocoa butter is removed leaving “chocolate liquor.”

The cocoa butter is then added back to the liquor in various amounts to make different types of chocolate. Sugar and flavorings are also added to create flavored or market-appealing varieties.

The most common types of chocolate and their components include:

Cocoa powder has a range of 10 to 25% cocoa butter added back to the liquor. Unsweetened cocoa powder is used in baking cakes, cookies, and in puddings and pie fillings.

Unsweetened chocolate, or baker's chocolate, has only about 5% cocoa butter added back. Bakers chocolate is also used in baked goods and desserts.

Bittersweet chocolate is hugely popular and can have a range of 15 to 50% cocoa butter added to the liquor. Sometimes a small percent of sugar or flavorings are added. Bittersweet chocolate is extremely popular for eating out of hand or added to baked goods and desserts for deeper chocolate flavor.

Semi-sweet chocolate has about 15% cocoa butter and about 40% sugar added. Think chocolate chips for cookies and such.

Milk chocolate has only 10% chocolate liquor, about 20% cocoa butter, about 50% sugar, and about 15% milk solids, plus various flavorings and emulsifiers added. Milk chocolate is probably the most popular chocolate in America for eating straight from the wrapper.

White chocolate doesn’t include ANY amount of chocolate liquor. In fact, it is made from cocoa butter, milk, flavorings, and sugar. It’s a mystery to me why anyone would want to eat white chocolate, but they do.

Just for fun, if you and your friends are as fond of chocolate as I am, have a tasting of some of the single origin chocolates found in upscale markets to see if you can tell the difference. Can you taste the spicy notes found in the South American varieties? Or how about the floral undertones found in the chocolate from the Caribbean? This taste comparison will be a test every chocoholic will be happy to be part of. Enjoy!


A Baker’s Guide to Chocolate: A Collection of Recipes and Useful Information

"This Best Selling A Baker’s Guide to Chocolate: A Collection of Recipes and Useful Information Tends to SELL OUT VERY FAST! If this is a MUST HAVE product, be sure to Order Now to avoid disappointment!"

A Baker’s Guide to Chocolate: A Collection of Recipes and Useful Information

Product Description
Are you a chocolate lover? Do you love using chocolate in your baking? Then this is the E-book for you!

Explore the different kinds of chocolate and when and where to use them.

Learn tips and techniques for baking with chocolate and see numerous recipes including chocolate braided bread, peanut butter cookies with chocolate ganache filling and macadamia and raspberry chocolate chip cookies.

Vegan Apple Cider Doughnuts
Check out Veganbaking.net for more tasty information.
By Veganbaking.net on 2011-01-18 20:24:16


Chocolate Alchemical Formulations (Recipes)

If the thought of making chocolate right off the bat is a bit daunting, I would suggest you get you feet wet with just baking with some fresh cocoa. Actually, any recipe you find that calls for unsweetened baker's chocolate, you can just use your own cocoa liqueur. That is all it is after all. Pick your bean of choice (a rich Caranero or maybe a fruity Ocumare), roast it, shell it (for this amount, doing it by hand is not that bad) and grind it in your champion for a smooth liqueur or just a whirly blade grinder for more texture (really nice in the brownies).

All of the recipes in this first section are from Alice Medrich: Bittersweet Recipes and Tales from a Life in Chocolate. All of the recipes in this section call for cocoa nibs. A nice light introduction to cooking with fresh cocoa beans. Just roast up your cocoa beans of choice and then remove the husk by hand or with our cocoa mill.

If you get the chance to get this book, please do. It is amazing. Also, a thank you to Martha Simmons who got me the original recipes.

I have personally experimented with the following and really love results. These are recipes either that I have worked out or have collected from an unknown source over the years. In general, they call for you to roast your own beans and then make your own cocoa liqueur. Sort of the intermediate step to full chocolate making.

If you find a recipe that calls for bittersweet chocolate, just read this as 70% cocoa, 30% sugar. So if you find a chocolate cake recipe that calls for 8 oz of bittersweet chocolate, I just put in 5.6 oz (actually I round up to 6 oz, I figure you can't have too much chocolate really) of cocoa liqueur, and 2.4 oz of sugar. Once all the rest of the ingredients are added, the sugar will dissolve and no one will be the wiser (except, of course, this may well be richer - life is so tough)

If you come up with a recipe either for a dessert or a nice chocolate, let me know and I will see about putting it up here.


Baker's Chocolate Recipe Booklet, 1922, "Choice Recipes Compliments of Walter Baker & Co."

Baker's Chocolate Company -- the oldest manufacturer of chocolate in the United States -- was established in 1780. Over the next two centuries, the company would earn awards for its chocolate and in 1881, the company adopted its recognizable trademarked image, La Belle Chocolatiere (The Chocolate Girl). Since 1870, the company has published cookbooks, like this one, with recipes for beverages and desserts utilizing the company's chocolate products.

Baker's Chocolate Company -- the oldest manufacturer of chocolate in the United States -- was established in 1780. Over the next two centuries, the company would earn awards for its chocolate and in 1881, the company adopted its recognizable trademarked image, La Belle Chocolatiere (The Chocolate Girl). Since 1870, the company has published cookbooks, like this one, with recipes for beverages and desserts utilizing the company's chocolate products.


Для показа рекламных объявлений Etsy по интересам используются технические решения сторонних компаний.

Мы привлекаем к этому партнеров по маркетингу и рекламе (которые могут располагать собранной ими самими информацией). Отказ не означает прекращения демонстрации рекламы Etsy или изменений в алгоритмах персонализации Etsy, но может привести к тому, что реклама будет повторяться чаще и станет менее актуальной. Подробнее в нашей Политике в отношении файлов Cookie и схожих технологий.


Chocolate Tasting Guide

Chocolate, much like wine or cheese, can vary vastly from brand to brand, and even within brands. The quality of chocolate depends on the origin of cocoa beans, as well as how they are roasted, processed and blended. And, just like wine, there is no definitive right or wrong as far as taste goes it is a personal preference. With the vast differences among types of chocolate, cocoa percentages and brands, it is helpful to taste chocolates before baking with them to find one whose flavor you enjoy. Here are a few helpful hints for tasting.

Professional chocolate tasters break chocolate down by appearance, aroma, break (how it snaps), melt, taste and aftertaste. Depending on the style of baked good you're making, you may value one or more of these qualities more than others. For example, if you're making truffles, appearance and intensity of flavor is paramount you want a shiny truffle with a rich chocolate flavor. But with brownies, on the other hand, flavor is still important, but appearance less so.

In any case, all those descriptors can be more easily broken down for home use into taste, texture and aftertaste. You may find the following descriptions helpful for evaluating:

  • Roundness
  • Fruit qualities (berry, dried fruit, prune, jammy, ripe, overripe, fermented)
  • Spices (vanilla, caramel)
  • Depth (deep, roasted coffee flavors)

Bittersweet & Semisweet:
In general, we find that bittersweet and semisweet can be used interchangeably in recipes without altering the outcome. The flavors of each individual chocolate, however, can be quite different, so taste each one before baking with it. If the chocolate is flat and bland, a chocolate mousse made with it is likely to be bland as well.

Although bittersweet lends an intense chocolate flavor, it often lacks the roundness that works well in chocolate mousse or truffles. It's a good choice for recipes such as bundt cake or soufflé, where the chocolate flavor needs to stand up to many other ingredients.

We find semisweet to often have rounder, fruitier qualities that work well in mousses, truffles and any recipe where the outcome depends heavily on the inherent flavor of the chocolate.

Chips & Chunks:
Chocolate chips or chunks are best used only as add-ins to recipes they shouldn't be used for melting or in the place of chopped bittersweet or semisweet chocolate. These chocolates have a different level of cocoa butter content, as they're designed to hold their shape when baked. As a result, they have a different texture in baked goods from melted baking chocolate.

Unsweetened:
Unsweetened chocolate (chocolate in its rawest tasting form) is unpalatable and therefore hard to taste on its own. This is a case where the appearance (dull or shiny) and the aroma may be your best clues as to its quality, intensity and flavor. Unsweetened chocolate is almost always used in recipes like brownies, where the addition of granulated sugar contributes to the texture of the finished baked good.

Milk & White:

Since milk and white chocolates are less useful in baking, we did not do a taste test. It should also be noted that milk and white chocolate do not carry the health benefits of dark chocolates.

Brands:

The following baking chocolates fared well in our five tasting categories (appearance, aroma, break, melt, taste and aftertaste) and are ranked according to our preferences.


Baker's Guide to Chocolate - Recipes

I love old magazine advertisements like this, they are full of color and character. This page has no date anywhere, but judging by the pictures on the other side, I’d say 1940s or 1950s. The recipe below was to compliment a “Chocolate Holiday Cake” which was on the back of the boxes of Baker’s Chocolate you bought.

Recipe is typed below as-is, you can click the picture to view a larger size if you like.

SPECIAL-OCCASION FROSTING

3 squares Baker’s Unsweetened Chocolate
1 1/2 cups sifted confectioners’ sugar
2 tablespoons hot water
1 egg
4 tablespoons softened butter

Melt chocolate in double boiler. Remove from boiling water add sugar and water and blend. Add egg and beat well. Then add butter, a tablespoon at a time, beating thoroughly after each amount.

This recipe makes 1 1/2 cups frosting, or enough to cover tops and sides of two 8- or 9-inch layers, or top and sides of 8x8x2-inch cake (generously), or top and sides of 10x10x2-inch cake.

NOTE: For a more generous frosting, double above recipe.

For almost 200 years the Walter Baker folks have been developing quality chocolate products. No wonder good cooks say: Any chocolate food worth making is worth making with Walter Baker’s Premium No. 1 Chocolate.


Baker's Guide to Chocolate - Recipes

Here are three recipes from a recipe advertisement slip from Baker’s German’s Sweet Chocolate – General Foods Kitchens. No date.

EASY ICEBOX CAKE

1 package Baker’s German’s Sweet Chocolate, melted
1 1/2 tablespoons water
1 egg yolk, unbeaten
1 tablespoon confectioners’ sugar
1/2 cup whipping cream
1 egg white, stiffly beaten
12 ladyfinger halves or vanilla wafers

Blend the melted chocolate with water. Add egg yolk and beat until smooth. Mix in the sugar. Whip cream and fold into chocolate. Fold in beaten egg whites. Line an 8 x 4 x 3-inch loaf pan with wax paper. Layer wafers with chocolate mixture. Chill overnight. Unmold. Serves 5.

CHOCOLATE SNOWBALLS

1 package Baker’s German’s Sweet Chocolate, melted
1 can Baker’s Angel Flake Coconut, toasted
Peppermint, coffee, or butter pecan ice cream

Combine chocolate and coconut. Spread on wax paper. Then roll scoops of ice cream in warm chocolate mixture. Serve at once.

POT DE CREME

1 package Baker’s German’s Sweet Chocolate
1 1/2 cups light cream
1/4 cup sugar
6 egg yolks, slightly beaten
1 teaspoon vanilla

Melt chocolate in cream over hot water. Blend in sugar. Stir gradually into yolks. Cook over hot water, stirring constantly, 7 minutes, or until mixture is like a thin pudding. Stir in vanilla. Pour into small cups. Serves 8.


Watch the video: Beginning Bakers Guide to Oreo Cheesecake Bars